Tag Archives: childhood

Family visit and a nice surprise!

My cousins Nancy, Mary Ann and Theresa from Meridian MS and beyond came in the shop yesterday for a brief visit. I have not seem them in many years so always good to see family faces, familiar cheekbones, eyes and smiles. They brought me gifts. Press photos of my Great Aunts Neill and Jane, along with vintage newspaper clippings from the 1930s and ’40s. Along with all this was a stack of love letters that Jane and her husband Frank (Marine Corps General Frank Loomis) wrote to each other during their separation because of WWII – tissue-thin typewritten carbon copies, dated and numbered.

Both Aunt Neill James and Aunt Jane Loomis have been important to my existence – not just because they are my family – because they were strong courageous independent women at a time when women were encouraged by culture to be seen and not heard. Aunt Neill James was celebrated in her day (the ’30s & ’40s) as a writer, world traveler and amateur anthropologist of sorts, and I have written several essays about her life that have been published. She was my hero when I was a child. I did not get to know Aunt Jane until I was an adult and my husband Robert and I visited her, along with cousins Thomas and June Snowden, in San Diego in her home on Sunrise Circle. At that time, Jane was sinking into Alzhiemer’s and eventually needed an assisted living arrangement. Thus, Thomas and June stayed at length in Jane’s home to begin closing it up and settling where Jane’s and Frank’s belongings should go. While assisting them clean out the attic there, we found the stack of letters, still in envelopes and tied together. These were eventually stored in the Snowden’s home in Meridian. June has since passed from this world into the next and wanted me to have these letters.

jane neill lettersReading these letters was (and still is) somehow a feeling of violating Jane and Frank’s privacy. On the other hand, Jane saved these letters for a reason – perhaps to let the family know how they lived, what they did, where they traveled, and how much they loved each other. Like Neill, Jane was a world traveler and experienced cultures that most small-town girls (born in Gore Springs MS) did not.

Attic treasures. Threads of commonality. Story material.

What’s in YOUR attic?

Getting Lost in the Process: Reclaiming the Freedom to Create

Today I am sharing words from Jonathan Fields from The Good Life Project. I follow the podcast from GLP, and listen to these video essays while I paint or clean or sort or create. Many of these makers say words I want to say to you about why I quit my job and started a new “maker life” in New Orleans. One of my top priorities in opening Uptown Needle & CraftWorks is to share the joy of creating things, and to encourage others to use their hands because, as Fields says, working with your hands “just plain does something to you.”
Whether you write or sew or paint or garden, the mere activity of using your hands connects to your Creator, which reconnects you to your inner maker source.

IMG_0931“When you watch kids create something, it’s like watching an artist who is given complete permission to explore, experiment, and express. There’s no sense of censorship or fear of judgment…at least not until we’re a bit older. Working with your hands just plain does something to you. It drops you into a place of pure creativity and consciousness. You become the process, you get lost in it. And that sensation is pure bliss. But, as we get older, we tend to go to that place less and less. We leave our artist maker side behind. And, in doing so, leave a part of us behind as well.” – Jonathan Fields

It’s time to reclaim the freedom to create, and find your “inner maker”. This is not a sales piece. This is an invitation. Yes, I’d love for you to sign up for a class; however, I’d love more for you to just stop by for conversation. Sit on our deck for a time and think about what you are called to do in life. Look through our shop and see if anything is calling your name. Try something new. Come play with us!

More than anything else, what do you love to do?

Gleaming White Paint Covers Neglect of the Past

This corner cabinet has been in my family for as long as I can remember. My father took it with us every time we moved. At one time it was built in, but somewhere along the way it was detached. Like anything this old, it carries stories. Not only family stories, but the stories of it’s life before my father claimed it.cabinet1
In my advance of years I’ve become somewhat of a hoarder when it comes to furniture and things that evoke memories. I don’t want to let go of them. But sometimes one must part with things that are meaningful. I am happy I did not part with this piece because it now has a new life in gleaming white paint. the amazing thing about paint is that it hides a multitude of sins. This cabinet was coated with some type of varnish that kept bleeding through the white enamel that I applied.  The only thing that covered that goo was spray enamel with built-in primer. After years of built-up grease and grime this piece is really a beautiful piece of furniture – after it’s covered with gleaming white paint. This little corner cabinet has a new home in the shop and holds colorful yarns. I’d love to see somethings you have re-done into something new. Send me a pic.
cabinet2  photo 2